Does the government actually have “probable cause” for a warrant?

MargaretDrawn Laws

And one final set of sketches from my Criminal Procedure notebook — this time about whether the government actually has a valid warrant, based on their claim of “probable cause”. These two pages are one long flowchart that set out the conditions for valid probable cause. Build more legal knowledge, and study up on your rights around the police and … Read More

Can you get a government search thrown out, even if you consented to it?

MargaretDrawn Laws

It’s the final countdown to this summer’s bar exam! Here’s one more flowchart from my Criminal Procedure sketchbook, this time about how to get things that the government found during a search (that you consented to) thrown out as evidence. Build more legal knowledge, and study up on your rights around the police and government agents: play Law Dojo — … Read More

Do you have a Reasonable Expectation of Privacy?

MargaretDrawn Laws

Two sketches from criminal procedure — all about the nebulous concept on whether a person can legally expect privacy in a situation. The standard is ‘reasonable expectation of privacy’ — and these cartoons start to explain what that means in specific contexts. Want to learn more about your privacy rights? Build more legal knowledge, and study up on your rights … Read More

Was it legal that the police stopped (and frisked) you? #barexam law cartoon

MargaretDrawn Laws

Some more criminal procedure notebook sketches — this time a short flowchart about whether it was legal that the police (or government agent) stopped you — and possibly frisked you. Here are the conditions that need to be met for stops-and-frisks to be legal under the Constitution (and case law that came from it). P.C. means ‘probable cause’ in my … Read More

Have the police truly ‘seized’ you? : #barexam cartoon

MargaretDrawn Laws

Day 3 of criminal procedure law drawings: this one on the question of whether the police have really ‘stopped’ or ‘seized you’ — versus a more voluntary encounter where you are not really under their custody and you can leave. The rules that apply are different depending on how the encounter is characterized. Want to learn more about your rights … Read More